Archive

bike shops

I went to the Hackney Cycling Showcase last Saturday, partly to catch Brian Deegan’s talk about the ‘light segregation’ scheme that he designed for Royal College Street (more about which in a separate post soon), but also to meet with Roman of London Green Cycles.

He was there to exhibit some of the many freight cycles and cargo bikes that London Green Cycles offer.  Here are some of them.  In front, the Bakfiets, which is probably the best known cargo bike in London.  Behind, the Omnium Mini, the bike with the big orange box is Bicicapace, with is a utility with capital ‘U’ and the last two wheeler is the Omnium Cargo, which is more or less a straight copy of the Bilenky Trashpicker.

I rode all of them, and they are all great bikes, fun to ride, and well-designed.  Surprisingly, my favourite was Bicicapace. I must be getting old.

Advertisements

 

NervesOfSteelFrom an article I wrote about my good friend Rebecca ‘Lambchop’ Reilly:

“I first heard about Rebecca Reilly sometime in 1995. I can’t remember where or from whom I heard the story. Perhaps it was Markus Cook, unofficial leader of the San Francisco Bicycle Messenger Association, who first told me of her. The tale was that there was a female messenger who was making a journey across the United States, visiting cities where there were messengers, living and working in each city in turn. And that she was writing a book, a collection of messenger experiences. She was reputed to be hard and fast. I was told that she was going to come to the 1995 Cycle Messenger World Championships in Toronto and win.”

Rebecca was a trail-blazer, a leader in the U.S. & international messenger community in the mid to late 90s.  She was crowned Fixed Gear Queen at the 1999 Cycle Messenger World Championships & received the Marcus Cook Award for Services to the International Messenger Community in the same year.  She was President of the District of Columbia Bicycle Courier Association in 2001.  In the same year she published ‘Nerves of Steel’, a unique & unprecedented study of bicycle couriers in the United States.

Emily Chappell, ‘That Messenger Chick’, recently traveled to the U.S., and whilst she was there met and interviewed Rebecca.  Emily then decided to bring Rebecca to England for short speaking tour, and LMNH East, 125–127 Mare St London E8 3RH, hosts the London leg this Saturday at 7pm.

Rebecca will be sharing her memories of her life as a courier, some of which will be guaranteed to appall, all of which will amaze and engage.  Expect frequent obscenity, laughter & tears, as ‘Lambchop’ recalls life before fakengers & fixies ruled the world.

The few remaining copies of ‘Nerves of Steel’, signed by Rebecca, will be available for purchase for £35 (the original print run was only 1000).    Although the event at LMNH is free to enter, guests will be encouraged to buy raffle tickets to defray costs.  The raffle prizes include some London Courier Emergency Fund goodies, a very fine Special Edition Brooks England B17 saddle and some wonderful cycling apparel by Swrve.

Tom Demerly with advice for Specialized on managing the PR disaster that is Café Roubaix.

tomdemerly

By Tom Demerly.

1476523_259366990888061_809245045_n

 

Thursday, 12 December, 2013. Addendum to this Story: 

On Thursday, December 12 Specialized Bicycles Founder Mike Sinyard traveled to Cafe Roubaix Bicycles to delivery a personal apology and retraction of legal threats against the retailer.  Read the complete story here.

 

 

Saturday, 7 December, 2013.

Bicycle mega-brand Specialized created controversy today when news of legal threats against a small, Canadian veteran-owned bicycle retailer surfaced in the Calgary Herald newspaper. The story reports that Specialized Bicycles has threatened legal action against Dan Richter, owner of Cafe Roubaix Bicycle Studio, for using the word “Roubaix” in the name of his business. “Roubaix” is a widely recognized word in cycling usage from the famous spring classic bicycle race, Paris-Roubaix. Specialized Bicycles also has a series of bicycles named Roubaix for which they own some naming rights.

The story has gained inertia on social media sites Facebook and…

View original post 619 more words


My neighbour recently had her bike stolen.  She wisely decided to replace it with a 2nd hand bike (there are more bicycles than people in the UK, and most of those are in people’s sheds or garages).  Her only criterion was that the bike should be red.  Being Hackney born and bred, she did not wish to purchase another stolen bike, thus rewarding a thief for theft, so she went to Bike Works in Bethnal Green.

Bike Works sold her this beauty for the absolutely astonishing price of £295.  Not only did the lady get a piece of British bicycle history, she also got a bike which was in perfect working order.  Bike Works only sell bicycles which they have first refurbished.  In this case, that meant new tyres, tubes and cables and not a great deal else apart from a lot of love.  I suspect that this bike must have been kept somewhere warm and dry for the past 40 years, given the condition of the gear mechanisms, which are more than serviceable.

The frame wasn’t made by Claud Butler himself, it was made by Holdsworth (who bought the name in 1960) sometime between 1965 and 1976. The frame is branded ‘Electron’, and according to this excellent page on Claud Butler frames and bicycles, this model was only offered between these years.

The Claud Butler name still has some residual glamour associated to it, even though the man whose stardust rubbed off is long dead, and the exact nature of his remarkable exploits are hazy at best even for confirmed bikies under the age of 60.  Reg Harris was the first British racing cyclist to capture the public imagination, and was a household name more than a decade before Tom Simpson.  Despite not achieving the goals expected of him, 3 Olympic gold medals, he was nevertheless an immensely popular figure,  occasionally eclipsing even the football stars of the day.
Reg rode a Claud Butler, and for this reason the CB head-badge features the Olympic rings, decades after Reg won his two silver medals at the 1948 Olympics.  Even at a distance of 60 years, his lustre is still bright.  He is very much from the golden era of cycle sport, the late 40s and 50s, the era of Bobet, Coppi and later Anquetil, when the sometimes brutal heroism of the black-smiths’ and farmers’ sons of the early years of the sport gave way to the burnished charisma of the motion picture era.  Reg was a real star.  I don’t know whether he kept a comb in his jersey pocket like Koblet, or wiped his face with a cologne-scented handkerchief like Bobet, but he certainly looked every bit as polished.

My favourite of all of his exploits is his come-back at the age of 54 to win the National Match Sprint Championship.  I read somewhere that he only did it to graphically illustrate his disgust at the contemporary state of British match-sprinting.  It doesn’t really say much for the competition that they could be beaten by a man 20 years past his best, no matter whether he had been the best in the world.

Reg Harris’ obituary.