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Monthly Archives: May 2014

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A play inspired by the death of a young cyclist will aim to highlight the danger of riding a bike in London.

Tamara von Werthern used the case of Eilidh Cairns, who was killed by a 32-tonne tipper truck in Notting Hill, as the basis for her play The White Bike.

Eilidh, 30, (below), was hit from behind as she cycled to work in February 2009. The first permanent ghost bike in London was erected in her memory nearby. HGV driver Joao Pedro Lopes was convicted of driving with defective eyesight and fined £200.

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Ms von Werthern, 36, a mother of two from Hackney, said she decided to write the play after returning from maternity leave and passing the crash site on her daily ride to work in Shepherd’s Bush.

She saw many similarities between Eilidh’s life and her own and used it as the…

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This is written question from London Assembly Member Darren Johnson to the London Mayor Boris Johnson with the Mayor’s reply below.
I am pretty shocked by this, as London buses have direct vision cabs, which I had always considered much safer than traditional ‘high-cab’ lorries, as they do not have the same problems with seeing cyclists (or pedestrians) to their left front, and so had assumed that the bus / cyclist KSI numbers must be much better.  How wrong I was to make this assumption.  If these numbers are right, then there is something very, very wrong on London’s roads, especially given that we have always been presented the bus lane as the next best thing to a ‘proper’ segregated bike lane.
Tom Kearney has been making a fuss about what he considers negligent behaviour by London bus companies for some considerable time now.  I guess I should have been paying more attention.
Cyclists and buses
Question No: 2013/4666
Darren Johnson
Are you aware that since you became Mayor there are some years when the number of cyclists killed or suffering major injury per bus km travelled is greater than the number of killed or seriously injured per HGV km travelled? Given your direct control over how London buses perform, will you include reducing casualties as part of the bus contracts?
Written response from the Mayor
I am strongly committed to ensuring the safety of cyclists and other vulnerable roads users when sharing the road with London’s buses. I recently published my Road Safety Action Plan: Safe Streets for London. This sets an ambitious target of a 40 per cent reduction in killed and seriously injured (KSI) casualties by 2020. This covers all road traffic KSI casualties, including those involving buses and coaches.
 
TfL has an on-going programme of measures to reduce the number of collisions involving buses. This includes training and advice for bus drivers and cyclists, improvements to junction design and infrastructure, route risk assessments and a comprehensive incident reporting system.
 
London’s bus drivers are trained to consider the safety of cyclists through the bus driver BTEC module on cyclists and other vulnerable road users.  TfL and bus operators work together to increase drivers’ awareness of cyclists, how they use the road and their vulnerability, through such initiatives as the Big Red Book, the ‘Big Bus Little Bike’ DVD and Exchanging Places events at bus garages.
 
Bus route risk assessments are undertaken on every bus route and cycle initiatives, including new cycle infrastructure, are explained to bus operators to make sure they understand how to use them safely. Bi-annual audits are conducted to ensure the risk assessment process is thorough and relevant and all serious bus collision incidents are reviewed collaboratively with the MPS Collision Investigation Unit.
 
Furthermore, TfL will continue to examine collision statistics and police collision investigation reports to ensure measures are deployed where they can most effectively improve safety.

Deghri Messengers is a bike messenger service in Beirut. This means we deliver all kinds of stuff around the city using only bicycles and the power of our own bodies. It’s hard work and takes a special mix of fitness, passion for cycling, city orientation and pure guts.

 

some of the Deghri messengers taking a break from the road

Luckily we’re not on our own. There is an international community of bike messengers – professionals who work on their bikes every day to serve businesses in their respective cities. In the age of the internet, we can feel connected to this community by sharing news and advice online. However, nothing beats actually getting together with hundreds of messengers in one city, and this is what the ECMC (European Cycle Messenger Championship) is all about.

In the championships (this year from 3rd to 6th July in Stockholm, Sweden), messengers come together to hang out, exchange stories and most importantly to race! The goal is to be crowned the fastest messengers in and around Europe.

As a fairly new messenger service, it’s extremely valuable for us to attend the championship, meet other messengers and of course test our riding skills. What’s more, we will be representing Lebanon at this event, the most important in the bike messenger calendar in this part of the world.”

A lot more info on their Zoomal page.

Calvin Simpson's name, painted on Stamford Street.This is the text of some words of mine that were broadcast on the Relatively Good Radio Show today on Resonance FM.

I didn’t know Mark Francis at all, really.  People said to me, yeah, yeah, you do, you know, the tall mixed race kid, he was always at the Duke of York on Clerkenwell Road on a Friday, with all the other couriers.  At the service, they projected pictures of him that people had brought along, pictures of him from his childhood, and there was a photo that had been taken a couple of months before, at a party that the London Bicycle Messenger Association had organised.  I recognised him, and thought, bastard, he still owes us £3!

He had come up us at the door, and said, can I come in, and see if I like it, and then come back and give you the dosh?  Of course he hadn’t come back. And he wasn’t going to be able to pay me now.

Sebastian Lukomski, I actually did know a bit.  He was a hard-working hard-partying Polish guy who had come to a big international courier event that I had helped organise, and, like Mark, used to hang out at the Duke of York. 

All the others, Joe Cooper, Judy Mihlenstedt, Calvin Simpson, Paul Ellis, Edward Newstead, Reidar “Danny” Farr, & Henry Warwick, all these bicycle couriers I didn’t know at all before.  I met Edward Newstead’s kids at one of the West End magistrates court, at the trial, which took place months afterwards.  After the verdict, they had questions that I couldn’t really answer.

I helped paint the names of all of these people on the road, in the road, as close as possible to the spot where the incidents happened, some of the names we painted 4 or 5 times.  It’s almost impossible to put into words how strange and unsettling it is to paint the name of a dead person you didn’t really know on a road in central London.

Yesterday, I rode my bike with Southwark Cyclists up from Peckham Rye to meet the Big Bike Ride, an event organised to publicise London Cycling’s Campaign push to get more Space For Cycling.  We stopped at Newington Butts, at the south end of the Elephant & Castle roundabout, a junction that Boris Johnson said was perfectly safe to cycle “as long as you keep your wits about you”.  The junction has been recently re-engineered.  The re-organisation was supposed to make what is more or less a dual-carriageway intersection safer for cyclists use.  

Fatima Manah & Cynthia BarlowWhen I arrived at the junction, I spotted a lady in a head-scarf, holding a bunch of lilies.  Then I noticed Cynthia Barlow, who was recently awarded an OBE for her work as Chair of Roadpeace, the charity that supports the families of road crash victims, standing next to her.  And my heart fell. Abdelkhalak Lahyani was killed last week whilst cycling through Newington Butts.  I was introduced to his widow, Fatima.

I am sick of meeting the families of people that I didn’t know, whose relatives were killed whilst cycling in London.  Mr Johnson, you said you wanted London to be the best city in the world to cycle in.  We need the right actions and infrastructure, not more words and paint.

More about the 9 London bicycle couriers known to have been killed whilst working.

Relatively Good Radio Show on Resonance FM, 18th May 2014, during which these words were broadcast.

ITV London News item about the incident, which features an appeal from Fatima for more to be done by TfL to safeguard cyclists.

Full text of Cynthia Barlow’s speech at the vigil on Southwark Cyclists web-site.

Leon Daniels, Managing Director, Surface Transport, Transport for London responds to a letter from Road Danger Reduction Forum, LCC, CTC, Roadpeace & others expressing concern about the ‘cyclists stay back’ stickers that have started appearing on the back of all sorts of motor vehicles, not just high-cab lorries: “I do not agree that ‘cyclists stay back’ message implies cyclists are 2nd class road users who should defer to motor vehicles”.

More on from Dr Bob on RDRF blog.

Road Danger Reduction Forum

CyclistsStayBack1 In February 2014 the Road Danger Reduction Forum, along with the London Cycling Campaign; CTC: the national cycling charity; RoadPeace: the national charity for road crash victims; and TABS: the Association of Bikeability Schemes came together to explain our concerns to, and ask for action from, Transport for London .  Last week we received a reply from TfL (see below). Because we think that this reply misunderstood the basis of our concerns, our organisations sent a reply today repeating them and suggesting ways forward, as follows:

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